Monday, September 15, 2014

THAT FALLOW TIME...

Just an awesome close-up
of a squirrel...
for no reason at all.
Despite my good intentions, writing has been on the back burner this month as I've worked to acclimate my youngest to his new school, mail everything my eldest forgot to take with him to college, encourage my high school senior as he wrestles with the Common App, and drive my busy eighth-grader all over the east side.

I tell myself these are the reasons I haven't been writing but the truth is more complicated. I've grown somehow frightened of my manuscript. I am uncertain whether I have the strength and skill to fix the pacing problem I see or finish all the research required to get certain elements right. When I think of the careful reread I need to give the piece--and the outline I should probably make at this juncture--I yearn to both sleep and cry.

Lately, though, there have been moments--mostly while I am driving carpools or washing my hair--when I feel that connection to my characters somehow re-electrifying. I've started scribbling notes again, looking for the courage I need instead of just hiding behind my to-do list of laundry and shopping.

I feel like this odd, fallow period may yet yield something worth putting on the page. At least, I hope it will.


Tuesday, September 2, 2014

September, here we go!

As of today, all four of my boys are back at school. I'm feeling rather queasy about my 8yo's classroom placement and nervous about getting my high school senior through the college application process. I'm mired in two manuscripts and trying to figure out a new fall writing routing (that leaves a little room for exercise)--fast!

On a bright note, over the last few weeks, I've done a bit of living. Visited New Hampshire where I kayaked on a beautiful lake and toured some serene gardens. Hit Seattle's Bumbershoot festival for the first time with my 13yo--it was awesome, especially Punchline Comedy and a live performance of The Moth radio hour. Went to the Evergreen State Fair in WA with hubs and the boys where, beyond the gut-punchingly delicious fair food and Ferris wheel traditions, the highlight for me was holding the MOST ADORABLE four-month-old bunny.

Holding a teeny brown frog
(bunny photo coming soon)
In fact, catching rays and getting with nature were two nice themes of late summer. Here's hoping they lead to some good words by the light of my keyboard this month!

What's up with your back-to-school routines?

Monday, August 25, 2014

I'm back from dropping off eldest at college on the east coast, and we're at THE SOUND OF LETTING GO summer blog tour finish line! Go check out  Candace’s Book Blog for the final stop and giveaway!

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Summer Reading...

I have come to believe that the phrase "lazy days of summer" is utter b-s. The last couple of months have careened by, leaving in their wake the usual quantities of dust, dirty dishes and epic laundry piles thus making August pretty much the same as February--heck, we've even had some rain.  Despite this, I have managed to sneak in some pleasure reading. No time for lengthy reviews but I'd like to give a shout-out to two titles here:

Allen Zadoff's first installment of his Unknown Assassin series does not disappoint. He has created a post-millenial teenage James Bond who weaves through issues of attraction, teen angst and lost parents as he simultaneously completes missions that would make superagents thrice his age quake in their Converse sneakers. Pick it up--you won't put it down until the last page. If you're like me, reading the paperback, you'll keep going through the teaser for Book 2 which, luckily, pubs this fall!
 You read a grown-up book? You seem surprised. After having several folks recommend this to me, I felt I had to give it a go. Set in Seattle (my current stomping grounds), this send-up of Microsoft and PacNW culture has you laughing then pausing to look ruefully in the mirror. It is scarily spot-on in so many ways I hesitate to recommend it to my book group because it might hit too close to home for some of us. That said, I enjoyed the fresh form of the novel which is largely epistolary (scathing emails, school memos, various letters). And, as a musing on the notion of human creativity as a process, a means of self-valuation, and a legacy, it is an interesting book.

Here are the last two SOUND OF LETTING GO Blog Tour stops 
and a link to the rafflecopter: